News

Stephenson Cancer Center Announces $20 Million TSET Expansion Grant to Oklahoma Tobacco Research Center

The Oklahoma Tobacco Settlement Endowment Trust has awarded a five-year, $20 million grant to Stephenson Cancer Center to fund the expansion of the Oklahoma Tobacco Research Center. Grant dollars will directly support the Oklahoma Tobacco Research Center, a program of the Stephenson Cancer Center. Tobacco use in Oklahoma continues to be our greatest preventable cause of premature death and disability, and the economic cost to our state exceeds $2 billion.

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Two behavioral scientists who specialize in tobacco control research, Darla Kendzor, PhD, and Michael Businelle, PhD, have been recruited to the Stephenson Cancer Center at the University of Oklahoma. They bring expertise in utilizing targeted incentives and mobile health technologies as a tool for curbing tobacco use and promoting healthy lifestyle choices, with a particular focus on low socioeconomic status populations.

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Stephenson Cancer Center Recruits Tobacco Prevention and Control Researchers for Leadership Positions

Two tobacco control researchers, Jennifer Irvin Vidrine, PhD, and Damon Vidrine, DrPH, have been recruited to key leadership positions at the Stephenson Cancer Center located at the University of Oklahoma. Jennifer Vidrine will serve in the newly established role of Deputy Director for Tobacco Research. She will also be appointed Director of the Oklahoma Tobacco Research Center and oversee the center’s tobacco research activities. Damon Vidrine will serve as co-leader for the Cancer Health Disparities Program.

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Oklahoma Tobacco Research Center at the Stephenson Cancer Center Hosts Symposium on Tobacco Research Prevention

Research on a broad range of tobacco prevention efforts in Oklahoma were the focus of a symposium conducted on May 12 by the Oklahoma Tobacco Research Center at the Stephenson Cancer Center. Presented during the symposium were 16 peer-reviewed research articles published in the January 2015 supplement to the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

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Exposure to even minimal levels of secondhand tobacco smoke causes significant DNA damage in human cells, according to a study using a new detection method. DNA damage plays a key role in the development of cancer and other neurodegenerative, pulmonary, cardiovascular, and aging-related diseases. 

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